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DaveTrojan

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 #1 

What I learned at the Wreck Chasers Symposium, my two cents worth. 

            It was a great opportunity to bring together people with the same interests and learn from some of the best professionals in the field. I learned the difference between Wreck chasers and Aviation Archaeology, Wreck Chasers research to find a wreck, Aviation Archaeologists research before and after finding the wreck location to learn more about the story behind it. I learned about the different federal and state laws that govern wreck sites, how to protect the resources, and how to interpret the sites and educate the public and other government bodies. Yes, it was worth attending and very interesting! 

            Wreck chasing is just a hobby for some, but a more serious endeavor for others. Some only want information about one site while others want to visit as many sites as they can.  

            I believe that a more formal organization can only help. Coming from a military background I believe that having standards for reporting, documenting and site stewardship is what is needed. Providing guidance to people involved in wreck chasing from the beginner to the expert is what a national organization can and should do. I also believe that this whole wreck chasing thing should be fun and adventuresome. We can not let it become too dragged down with burdensome rules and regulations. No one person could and should be responsible for forming a national governing body. Nick, Craig and others have done outstanding jobs by providing information and guidance. If more people could share the burdens of maintaining data bases, web sites, and just answer questions, that would be a big help.  I have stepped up every time I was asked to help out with a question about avionics or the Navy. I’m sure others are experts at their fields that could lend a hand. At the same time people need to be patient. Again, this is a hobby, no is being paid to do work for the organization. You should not be in this hobby to make money. You should be in this hobby to honor those who sacrificed their lives for their country!

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NVWarbirds

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 #2 
Dave, I agree with you.

Not to stir the pot or create dissention within the ranks........I also believe that to gain credibility with those that we seek permissions from, or individuals or agencies that we wish or need to deal with, the terms "wreckchasing or wreckchasers" may have negative consequences or impact.

We know we are "wreckchasers" and wear that badge with pride, but maybe it is time to push out a more PC term for our advocation???? 
DaveTrojan

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 #3 
I like the term "Crash Explorer" myself.
DaveT
MHensarling

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 #4 
Well stated, Dave!

We need to find a balance between standardized guidance and keeping the spirit and pursuit of knowledge (and adventure!) alive and well.  It's my sincere hope that something more formalized will open more doors by the credibility we all look to generate by combining our efforts and at the same time distancing us from those who do not share our values. It's my personal belief, and hopefully the belief of many others, that any organization formed should be not-for-profit. Any such organization would ideally be driven by a board and not by one person. I would also see a board being made up of termed limit seats.  You hit it on the head, this is a hobby for some. How do we utilize that time spent as a hobby and to the benefit of the bigger picture? I don't have the answer there. 


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Matt Hensarling
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 #5 

I’m glad someone opened this thread.

I have never cared much for either the terms “wreck chasing” or “aviation archeology.”


Wreck chasing sounds too much like ambulance chasing and using the word “archeology” brings up images of digging for dinosaur bones. I wish there was a term that was someplace in between that combined the ideas of history, aviation, rediscovery, commemoration and perhaps a few other notions.


"Crash Explorer?" I don't know about that one.  Sounds like you should be wearing a helmet when you are doing it.


However, I like the term having the word "aviation" in it someplace.

 


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MHensarling

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 #6 
Aviation Historian is one I like to use for people are only doing research.  As for field work, where you are mapping a site and understanding it's layout, etc.. it's archaeology. Not sure what else you'd call it other than what it is...

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Matt Hensarling
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CheckSix

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 #7 
My chief complaint is the frequent misspelling of "archaeology" - the second "a" seems to be the most slippery vowel in existence .  But what the typical practitioner of the hobby does is often so much more than simple archaeology or surveying (anyone who has taken a course in archaeological field work knows it is more surveying than digging).

I heard the term "aviation history story teller", "aviation historical preservation specialist", "crash hunter", "wreckologist", and the like.



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djordan

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 #8 
 
       
               


       
       
       

a

ar·chae·ol·o·gy or ar·che·ol·o·gy  audio  (ärk-l-j) KEY  

NOUN:
The systematic study of past human life and culture by the recovery and examination of remaining material evidence, such as graves, buildings, tools, and pottery.

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Don Jordan
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 #9 
My BA in archaeology tells me this is the correct term.

I think its a perfect fit for what we do.

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Xelex

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 #10 
I guess I should have expected a veiled insult from Chris. At least it showcases his ignorance of the English language.

"Archeology" is an alternate spelling for "archaeology." Both spellings are accepted although the print version of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) insists on a third version, "archæology," with the ligature in the middle. The origins of the word archeology are found in Old English, and derived from the Greek "arkhaios" meaning ancient. The OED says that the first occurrence of the word "archæology" was in 1607, in English bishop and satirist Joseph Hall's Holy Observations Lib. I. During Hall's time the vowel sound in the middle of archæology would have been a flat a, as in, "cat." During the Great Vowel Shift, the flat "a" shifted to an "ee" sound. An attempt was made in the 20th century to simplify the spelling to "archeology," but many archaeologists, being stodgy and fond of old things, still cling to the more archaic spelling. 
PACS

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 #11 

The little nugget of information I learned from attending the meeting came from Matt Cerkel, “TamRanger.”

This is an important bit of information for any Wreck Chaser, Aviation Archaeologist, Aviation Archeologist or whatever you wish to be called.

Putting up a “memorial” at a crash site is darn near impossible within any type of public land/park/wilderness area/etc. (county, state or federal). However, putting up an “Interpretative Marker” is an entirely different matter.

Seems that when you call this thing you want to put up a memorial, it is viewed by the powers at be as some sort of religious object. However, take the same information and call it an “Interpretative Marker” or words to that effect, and it is viewed in an entirely different light and perhaps even considered a welcome addition to the area.

Thanks Matt – your talk alone was worth the investment in time.


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Ken Freeze, PACS, USCG (ret)
Remembering those Coast Guard aviators who did not return.
http://www.check-six.com/lib/Coast_Guard_Aviation_Casualties.htm
NVWarbirds

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 #12 
Research
Locate
Document
Preserve
Protect
DaveTrojan

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 #13 
I always omitted the "a" in Archeology just because it was one less key stroke and it was OK with spell check.
For the benefit of PACS I'll say I'm an "Aviation" Crash Explorer. 
When I write, I usually use the term Aviation Historian. How do you get a degree in Aviation history anyway? I don't think Embry Riddle offers that.
Dave
AAIR

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 #14 
Research
Locate
Document
Preserve
Protect


That is archaeology in a nutshell.

If the goal is to obtain credibility with individuals and agencies, having archaeology in the name will definitely help. There are numerous archaeology "clubs" that non-professionals are involved in that have credibility and often work closely with agencies:
http://archaeology.about.com/od/amateurarchaeology/a/h_clubs.htm


Side note, the spell check on this message-board only has archeology and not archaeology in it!

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CheckSix

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 #15 

Quote:
I guess I should have expected a veiled insult from Chris.  

If there was any sort of insult - which I fail to see unless you are really stretching it - it would have been directed at my own father (Sorry, dad!  You can pistol-whip me later).

<soapbox mode on>

Professionally, the double-A appears with much more frequency, without question.  And while the poster to About.com that's been quoted may have some done some homework as to the origins of the spelling (Xelex's reference, not AAIR's), I made a simple online comparsion... Search hits on Yahoo!
"archaeology" = 78,500,000 hits, versus "archeology" = 20,400,000 hits: nearly a 4 (3.848 to be exact) to 1 ratio, and that's not factoring the website titles that prefer the double-A, like "Archaeology" magazine, but through creative meta-tagging, include the single-A variant!
But, it's a free country - I will continue to raise my glass of root beer in a silent toast to that missing second A, whenever it is part from its brother A.

<soapbox mode off>

Hey, I remember back when we used this board to talk about airplanes!


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