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jaj19981

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 #1 
I ordered two books on the check-six.com website on December 6th, but never received any sort of order confirmation or the books. I sent an email to them asking about it on December 21st and received a reply that same day asking me to "resend the information" so took a screenshot of the transaction in paypal and emailed it to them. I still haven't received the books or another response to the email, etc.  I opened a dispute with Paypal today in order to get the $56 back, but wanted to warn the community of the problems encountered while dealing with them (or attempting to deal with them).

Jeremy
XHunter

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 #2 
Jeremy,

 Welcome to the board and thank you, we appreciate your concern for the other members. I'm sure we all hope this comes to a positive conclusion. Although I have never actually seen the books you purchased, I believe they include what we used to call the CAP Crash List. I got one in the mail about a quarter of a century ago from a great guy named Louie Alley who worked Air Force Safety out of Kirtland AFB. Louie has since gone west and it's pretty tough to get Kirtland to respond to requests like they used to and for the life of me, I can't find my corrected e copy (my computer committed Windows 10 Hari-Kari last week). There are so many great people here on the board who might be able to find a copy for you or try to answer any questions you might have about Aviation Archeology. Also, have you looked through the "Resources" section of the site? There are many good books about the subject posted there like the "Wreckchasing: A Guide to Finding Aircraft Crash Sites" series (some of the best) by Nick Veronico, and Trey Brant's "Faded Contrails: Last Flights Over Arizona", just to name a few

Good Hunting,

Tony



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Rick

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 #3 
Air Force Rescue Coordination Center
Crash Locater Database - all states
https://www.1af.acc.af.mil/Units/AFRCC/Annual-Reports/State-Crash-Locator/
jaj19981

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Posts: 2
 #4 
Thanks for the information guys, appreciate that.  I have those other books you mentioned, but had not come across the AF database.  I thought I had a contact from a local safety office when I met a gentleman at a gun show last weekend, that I thought was going to help out with the accident reports, but I haven't heard back from him about a couple that we spoke about.

Still no word from the check-six folks, I'm going to just get a refund on that order.

I checked out the website and it looks like some of the lat/long info might be off by quite a bit.  Either that or I'm messing it up in the google maps.  The lat/long listed for the F-86 crash on Mt Lemmon (Arizona) puts you on the other side of a nearby mountain when you find the location on google maps.  But it's nice to have a list of crashes to investigate further even if the locations are inaccurate.

Jeremy
AAIR

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 #5 
As to the CAP list, the coordinates are to the minute, which is roughly a mile, meaning the measurement scale is to the nearest mile. So in theory, if the listing is perfect, that means somewhere from that spot, within a half mile, is the crash. In reality, I usually find 2 miles is closer to the average, and 10 is not unheard of (worst I have found is 56 miles, but that was due to transposed digits in the coordinate). Think of the list as a starting point saying that in this general area is a crash. Then if the list provides a date, or aircraft number you can research and deduce a date, you can start researching the crash for more clues to narrow down the search area. 


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