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ffuries

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 #1 
Back in 2008 we drove up to Parris Island MCRD in South Carolina so I could pin-on/promote my son to Lance Corporal, we spent part of the day with him, looking around the base before heading back to Florida. He knew I wanted to see this, so off we went.

The sign posted there reads:

"These are the remains of a Brewster Buccaneer. Not a good combat bomber, most were assigned to training. This plane, attached to Page Field, about a half-mile north, crashed in 1943. Parts worth salvaging were removed, and the remainder, now upside down, was towed here where it would not obstruct the airfield. Both crewmen survived."


DSCN1282.jpg  DSCN1279.jpg  DSCN1280.jpg  DSCN1278.jpg  DSCN1281.jpg 



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Mike
TSgt USAF Retired
Jan 86 - Sept 08
Aircrew Life Support
"Your Life Is Our Business"
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DaveTrojan

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 #2 
I've known about this wreck for some time. I would like to learn more. According to one report, the plane wreckage lies along the walking trail at Parris Island. Can you be more specific about its location?
Here is another photo of plane wreck
parris-island-plane-south-carolina.jpg

ffuries

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 #3 
Yes sir there is a walking trail over by the base golf course that has the remains of it.
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Mike
TSgt USAF Retired
Jan 86 - Sept 08
Aircrew Life Support
"Your Life Is Our Business"
(122X0, 1T1X1, 1P0X1)
NRA Member
Dennis

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 #4 
Just looked this post over again.  They really went to town taking parts off that wreck.  FWIW, there is a much nicer Buccaneer (known as a Bermuda I to the British) at Tullahoma Airport in Tennessee (or part of it).  That plane had 8, yes, 8 forward firing machine guns.  2 .50s in the cowl firing through the propeller arc, and 6 .30 calibers, 3 in each wing.  It also had a .30 caliber flexible gun in the rear cockpit.  Another interesting feature of the SB2A was a full span STEEL armored leading edge on the 47 foot non folding wing.
There had once been 5 SB2As abandoned at Tullahoma, but Tallichet came and took 4 of them (one now fully restored and in the Pensacola Naval Air Museum) leaving this one at the airport.   Dennis
DaveTrojan

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 #5 
"leaving this one at the airport. Dennis" 

Pictures please....
Dennis

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 #6 
Brewster SB2A 1.jpg  Brewster SB2A 3.jpeg  Brewster SB2A 2.jpg.jpeg
Dennis

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 #7 
What a frustrating afternoon.  First, I had to scan these pictures from my old photos to the computer (then find where they went, then move it to "my pictures").  Then after typing a very nice reply and adding the pictures, everything wouldn't post and "went away" - 3 TIMES.  Finally I tried just the pictures and it took, but it wouldn't allow me to add any words.[mad]
Here's the story:
I first saw this plane in a 1980 issue of "Sport Aviation".  The article Stated that "parts and pieces of several more are nearby, but all are badly damaged and heavily corroded".  What more can a wreckchaser ask for? [smile].  Fast forward 9 years and my wife and I are on vacation at Tim's Ford State Park (about 20 miles away, and NO coincidence).  One day (planned), I drive up to see if the plane is still there.  A guy asks if he can help me and I tell him what I am looking for.  He takes me to the plane and replies "You came all the way up here from Tim's Ford to see THIS?".  I answer: "No, I came all the way up here from St Pete Florida to see this".
The story was that there were about 5 of them back in the bushes.  At one time, they were fairly intact.  I'm thinking one of 2 strong possibilities.  First, they were abandoned by the military after the war.  One way of "de-milling" aircraft was to attach a chain to the front and a chain to the rear and use trucks to rip the planes in half.  The damage certainly could indicate this happened.
The other theory is that the planes were bought surplus, ferried to Tullahoma, and stripped of their engines and propellers and abandoned.  This could be true as well.  I've seen articles that included Brewster SB2As in surplus sales.
Of additional interest: the plane also has 1/8" aluminum plate armor riveted along the sides of the pilot's compartment and the gunner's compartment.  the picture wouldn't fit (3 picture limit?), but the bomb bay also had all of the bomb handling gear still in it (internal bomb load). 
As I understand it, NO SB2A was ever used in combat.  It was considered the WORST production aircraft of WWII.  It was also said the many were built, test flown and stored until being scrapped. Another story has many SB2As being loaded onto a barge and being taken out to sea off Jacksonville NAS and pushed over the side.  It is a fact that many were used for training and that they had a tendency for the empennage to separate if pulled out of a dive too rapidly.  Dennis
Edit: the current Google Earth does not show the plane at Tullahoma Airport.  I'm going to try to contact someone and see if it is still around.  I do know that it showed up on GE a few years back.  Hope it wasn't scrapped.  D.
Dennis

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 #8 
A little research later and believe it or not, this IS the same plane that was at Tullahoma.  As I recall from a few years back, a guy financed the restoration to the tune of about 1 million dollars.  He had memories of a fatal SB2A crash from childhood.
SB2A.jpg 

ChrisBrame

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 #9 
Actually the one displayed at Pensacola is the best of the five from Tullahoma, but not the one in your photos (that one's now at Pima). This was the only one with an intact tail and a known ID (RAF serial FF860); the Navy scrapped the remains of the other three. Interesting to see it hanging from the ceiling; the post-restoration photos I've seen show it displayed on its gear.
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