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Mtflyer

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 #1 

Last weekend I headed out to the Mojave desert to look for the crash site of the TB-26B #41-39310 that went down on 1/31/58 after it’s tail was torn off in a mid-air with the TB-26B #44-34668. I was given the location of the tail a couple of years ago and I had a pretty good idea where the main site was from the information in the crash report. I was able to find both sites, but I was expecting to see an intact tail section. The tail was disassembled, as if someone had plans on recovering it, but never finished.

 

What’s funny is that I was telling a friend at work about it. Wondering, why would someone go through all that work of taking it apart, then leaving it? His answer was “Maybe they wanted the bolts”.

 

 TB-26B Site Photos Here

 

Joe


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unimogbert

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 #2 
Great trip! Thanks for sharing!

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XHunter

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 #3 
 Joe, nice one! Not to many B-26's laying around southern California. And the part with the round aluminum flap and large alligator clip on the 5th page of photos is, I believe, part of an oxygen system hose connector.

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JimRowan

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 #4 

Very Nice find~~~ Jim Rowan

XHunter

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 #5 
 Joe,

  Here's a "walk around bottle" set up with the connector

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Dennis

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 #6 

So you have a Martin TB-26B and a Douglas TB-26 in the same crash?  That's interesting.  I'm suprised that a Martin TB-26 was stil in use as late as 1958.  The tail feathers look to be in pretty good shape.  Given the scaricity of Martin B-26 parts, those could come in useful.  Much better shape than the tail feathers we found. Dennis

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Mtflyer

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Tony, thanks for the info on that part. That’s definitely what it is.

 

 

Dennis, both of the TB-26Bs were manufactured by Douglas. According to Joe Baugher’s serial number list, they both started off as Douglas A-26Bs. They must have been converted to TB-26Bs sometime later. I had a drawing of the Martin B-26 up, changed it to the Douglas B-26.

 

As far as them being flown in the 50s, got this info from the Nat’l Museum USAF web site,

 

Some B-26Bs were converted to trainer aircraft and re-designated TB-26B. The modifications included removal of all offensive and defensive weapon systems and the addition of dual controls for aircrew training. The USAF used the TB-26Bs as trainers and transports throughout the 1950s. Some TB-26s were transferred to the Air National Guard and remained in service into the early 1970s.

 

The southern California deserts are a little easier on aluminum than the swamps in your part of the country.


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Joe Idoni

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Dennis

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 #8 
Two things threw me off on this.  The first was the obvious B-26 drawing, the second was the serial number.  A "41-" seemed a bit early for a Douglas B-26, and the "B-26" stamp on the ID tag would seem to indicate a Martin B-26 as the Douglas Invaders were called A-26s during WWII.  On a second look at your pictures, the remains of the fin do seem to be more squared off than the rounded surfaces of a Martin B-26.  Possibly, as you mentioned the part may have been replaced by a newer part.  I didn't pay attention to your pictures of Douglas parts because I figured they were from the other plane.
  There was a Martin TB-26, and they were used for target towing.  I thought it very unusual that a Martin B-26 of any kind would still be in use by the military as late as 1958.  I wasn't able to find 41-39310 on Baugher's web site.  I did neglect to commend you on another excellent visit and pictures.  Thanks again, Dennis
XHunter

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 #9 
Not to many A-26's laying about either

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skyraider0609

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 #10 
Joe,
The image on page 6 of a frame of some kind looks too flimsy to be part of a seat assembly. I think it matches up more with the boarding ladder in this pic. I believe that was how the aircrew boarded the Invader. Up on the wing and then into the cockpit from above. Nice find and presentation as always. Thanks for posting.

Pete

http://www.warbirdregistry.org/a26registry/a26-4435898.html

DaveTrojan

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 #11 

Joe,

I identified the radio equipment that you found.

It is all part of the ARC-27 radio set

 

Radio Set Control, C-628/ARC-27
Description: The C-628 is the radio set control for radio set ARC-27.

The MT-182/ARC-27 is the mount for the equipment

 

ARC-27 Description: The ARC-27 is a VHF/UHF-AM radio set intended primarily for use in aircraft. It is designed for air-to-air and air-to-ground station communications.  It includes one crystal-controlled guard frequency between 238-248 MHz. Two radios can be connected with necessary control units to allow repeater operation.

Frequency Range: 225-399.9 MHz
Power Input: 27.5 VDC
Power Output: 9 W
Number of Channels: 1750
Channel Spacing: 100 kHz
Manufacturer: Collins Radio

Date manufactured: about 1946

They were used on a variety of aircraft including A-26’s, C-118’s, C-124’s

The ARC-27 Radio was pretty good for the time, but had major problems. The ARC-27 had 98 tubes in it where most aircraft radios prior to that time usually had less that 10. This new technology was a nightmare to the older technicians in the AF at that time so very few of these radios were getting fixed properly. When aircraft newly arrived for their periodic maintenance cycle, the technicians would run out and "cannibalize" the working ARC-27s and put them into an aircraft that had already completed its periodic maintenance, but was on hold from returning to service because of the lack of ARC'27's. One Technician recounted that they had over 120 inoperable ARC-27s waiting to be repaired and were screwing up the whole west coast and Pacific flight scheduling.

DaveT

MHensarling

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 #12 
Looks like Dave beat me to the punch on the radios. He is right on with what he's posted though! 

Also on page 7  - Photo 4&5 show the remainders of the BC-453 radio tuner dial which would have been part of the SCR-274-N system.  And then Page 7 - Photo 2 is (I believe) the Manifold Pressure Push to Release knob.

Great sleuthing, Dave!

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DaveTrojan

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 #13 
Thanks Matt and thanks Joe for taking the time to photograph the parts for Identification.
The SCR-274-N radio set was developed to provide radio navigation reception and short range communication for the aircraft. The ARC-27 was used for longer range communication.
DaveT
Mtflyer

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 #14 

Pete, Dave and Matt, thanks for IDing those parts, I'll change the text on the photos.

Dennis, I can see how I made it confusing by posting that drawing of the Martin B-26. Baugher's site didn't list either of the planes evolved in the accident but did have the serial numbers 41-39310 & 44-34668 grouped with Douglas A-26Bs.

41-39300/39349  Douglas A-26B-25-DL Invader  c/n 7013/7062

44-34618/34753  Douglas A-26B-66-DL Invader  c/n 27897/2803

 

That tag on the rudder is kind of strange, the tail must be off one of the newer ones built after they were renamed to B-26s.

Joe


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Jeff_Wilkinson

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 #15 
Joe,

The tag on the rudder is from a depot overhaul and isn't a Douglas ID tag. OOAMA refers to the Ogden Air Material Area (called the Ogden Air Logistics Center today, at Hill AFB, UT), and was probably put on sometime after 1948.

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