Wreckchasing Message Board
Sign up  |   |   |  Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 3 of 4      Prev   1   2   3   4   Next
AAIR

Avatar / Picture

Super Moderators
Registered:
Posts: 658
 #31 

On 26 Jan 50, USAF C-54D 42-72469 failed to arrive at Great Falls MT on a flight from Anchorage AK. The last known position was over Snag, Yukon Territory, Canada. A massive joint US-Canadian search was conducted, but the aircraft and its victims were never found. With 44 people on board this is probably the largest unresolved missing aircraft case in North America.

 

Family members and interested researchers are spearheading an effort to renew the search for this aircraft. If you have not done so already, please consider joining his facebook page, Operation Mike, at http://www.facebook.com/operationmike. This page serves as a place for people interested in this accident to connect, and as new (or forgotten) information is discovered, it is being posted here for all to see and discuss.

 

This group is also petitioning the US government to have the Air Force reopen the search. Not only is the technology available today significantly advanced from what was available in 1950, archival records indicate that the original search, while large, was not as systematic or comprehensive as it should have been. The petition is at Whitehouse.gov, http://wh.gov/E7a


__________________
Craig AAIR, Aviation Archaeological Investigation and Research http://www.aviationarchaeology.com
Tech1

Registered:
Posts: 11
 #32 
I am fairly new to this forum and I have read all of the posts.  I was intrigued with Searchmaster's post of 12/16/08.  I decided to follow this and search good ole Google Earth close to Kalispell, Montana and work my way north.  I searched and tack pinned many questionable objects until I came across the attached image.  I have added images to the attached to compare to the Google Earth image in an attempt to identify the object that I believe is the missing aircraft.  I have a initial point of impact about a quarter of a mile from this image.  I thought that I would post this here as well as the Facebook "Operation Mike" site with hopes of identifying this site as a known crash site or the missing aircraft.  Please feel free to comment on the image.   

Attached Images
Click image for larger version - Name: 1.jpg, Views: 376, Size: 139.70 KB  Click image for larger version - Name: 2.jpg, Views: 455, Size: 136.44 KB 

B24CoPilotNiece

Registered:
Posts: 69
 #33 
Tech1 - Thanks for this post!
__________________
'There's room at the top'
Tech1

Registered:
Posts: 11
 #34 
This post is to update the C-54 aircraft image that I used previously to compare to an site that I believe is the missing C-54 aircraft.  The attached image is a nose on view of a C-54 aircraft and is a very good view to compare to the site that I have located.  The site has a aircraft that is in a nose up attitude.  The cockpit is separated from the main aircraft site.  I have drawn red lines to the site and the image to show the comparison.  The right inboard engine and prop.  The Squadron markings/stripe below the cockpit.  The aircraft radome with the very distinctive nose landing gear doors. Then the cockpit itself.  These are several comparison point that indicate this as a C-54 aircraft crash site.  Unless this is a known crash site, I believe that this is a credible crash site.  Please review what I have posted and I welcome all input to this find.

Thanks,
Paul


1.jpg
 

russfarris

Registered:
Posts: 182
 #35 

One issue - the C-54 in your picture has airborne weather radar. The problem is no C-54 in 1950 had weather radar. It was added in the late '50s/early '60s.  Below is a picture of the original stock nose.  Russ Farris



Tech1

Registered:
Posts: 11
 #36 
Thanks Russ for that great information.  It is disappointing, but still great information.  That definitely puts a dent in my theory.  Now my next question is does anyone know of a wreck in this area that could be the image that I see in Google Earth?
russfarris

Registered:
Posts: 182
 #37 
I'm of the opinion that this C-54 went straight in, as opposed to a crash landing.  There have been at least three C-54/DC-4 accidents where the aircraft suddenly went into a vertical dive with no recovery. Partial separation of an elevator was thought to blame, some changes were made and it never happened again. This was early 1950s. 

If it did go in vertically, it would be very difficult to see from the air, impossible from Google Earth. To illustrate this, there is a large aircraft crash site 20-25 nautical miles southwest of Gander International Airport, NF.  (I know the exact distance, but I don't  want to make it too easy)!  It flew into the forest in near level flight and is remarkably intact. Can you find it?  Tech1, you might find this to be an interesting exercise.   Russ Farris
Tech1

Registered:
Posts: 11
 #38 
Hi Russ, I have spent a few hours looking for the aircraft that you have indicated in your exercise.  I have spotted a possible site 20.9 nautical miles Southwest of the Gander International Airport.  I thought that I would let you know my progress in this exercise.  I have only had a few hours to look and some of the imagery is not very good.  Is this the aircraft that you indicated?
Gander to aircraft image.jpg 

russfarris

Registered:
Posts: 182
 #39 
That's it, nice job!  Same type aircraft you are looking for, a DC-4/C-54 of Sabena Airlines which crashed on approach to Gander in 1946.  Notice the cemetery in front of the aircraft - 25 of the victims were buried on site. Link to ground level pictures here:

http://www.ganderourtown.ca/LargeSabena30921.html

I also spotted what appears to be a large aircraft crash site only 3-4 miles SW of Gander. It resembles a PBY Catalina, at least in my mind.   Russ Farris
bigun1_6605

Registered:
Posts: 106
 #40 
Russ,

Earnest K. Gann, who wrote "Fate is the Hunter", described this DC-4 problem. He called it "unporting" from a missing hinge bolt. He said all DC-4's in the world were grounded to fix this problem, though his timeframe was obscure. I believe his incident was before the Korean War. 

Note the following blog about the problem:

http://www.pprune.org/archive/index.php/t-203324.html
  
Tech1

Registered:
Posts: 11
 #41 
I have located an image of what may be the inside view of the right aft section of a C-54D.  I would like to have another set of eyes and get your comments/opinions of this image.  I believe that this view is actually inverted.  The top view of the image is the lower portion of the aircraft.  I can make out four openings that appear to be the window openings of the right aft section of the aircraft.  this also has a tapered end that could match up to the taper of the fuselage at the vertical stabilizer area. Please feel free to add your comments.

Thanks,
Tech1


possible aircraft.jpg 
 

Tech1

Registered:
Posts: 11
 #42 
Well I haven't heard anything about my post dated 10/21 so I guess I will keep trying.  I have a image that I originally posted on 08/13 that I decided to print a copy of and put on the wall near my pc.  I noticed that there is what appears to be an arrow formed by the rocks and gravel that point directly towards the aircraft that I indicated on my post 08/13.  I am attaching a view of what I have indicated as an aircraft and then one with the arrow outlined.  Does anyone know of this as a known crash site?  I was hoping for some feed back on this image if anyone can help shed some light on this. 
arrow view 2.jpg arrow view 3.jpg 
Thanks,

Paul

Helicopper

Registered:
Posts: 5
 #43 
I will be up in the Yukon near Dawson City for 5 months this summer. I will be taking my Robinson R44 helicopter with me. Is your crash search anywhere near there. I should have lots of free time and fuel.
ghcoe

Registered:
Posts: 42
 #44 
I started to read this article today and for some reason this subject jumped to mind. Thought I would post it here maybe someone might be able to contact these people. What a great test for their computer program. Not to mention a great boost to there project if it were successful.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/weekendreads/a-treasure-hunter-went-missing-in-the-rocky-mountains-and-a-computer-algorithm-found-him-months-later/ar-AAil0Pz?li=BBnb7Kz
OklahomasFinest

Registered:
Posts: 2
 #45 
Hi,

So it appears this thread has been dead for sometime but I’ve always been interested in the subject. I visited the Yukon a few times as a kid and fell in love with the location.

To me, I think the aircraft would’ve already been found had it crashed on land. I’m not an expert, but I imagine with all the modern global positioning and map systems we’ve established would make it impossible for somebody not to have found it after nearly 70 years.

I am certain the plane attempted to make a landing on a flat lake sometime within the immediate short span before it’s final ping over Snag, YT. I imagine these planes would make signals every few hundred miles, which is why claims of sightings near Watson Lake and even into lower BC and Montana make no sense to me; why ping at your first checkpoint and not any others?

I think the plane may be deep underneath Aishihik Lake. It’s within 100 miles of Snag, has an average depth of 98ft (lowest point at 400ft), and would potentially be perfect for a natural landing strip. Lake Labarge is very similar in geographical measurements, and both lakes would fall in the immediate flying route for the C-54D.

That’s just my guess. Hopefully, this all gets resolved soon. Hey, it took nearly 70 years to find the Titanic.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.