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Searchmaster

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 #16 
I know of several local folks in the Cranbrook area that look for this plane every year.
The local newspapers, especially the Kootenay Advertiser, Lethbridge paper and the Fernie Free Press are gold mines of info. The eyewitnesses that are still alive are very helpful also.
This info is fairly localized; most folks interested in AF 2469 believe it is much further north and west. But the crash report mentions one sighting the 26th of a 4 engine plane flying at about 2000 ft altitude above the Alaska Highway at Summit at 109 Zulu time. That fits nicely into AF2469's schedule and makes me discount any reports from the northwestern portions of the route.
JasonC

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 #17 
Here is a thought, talked to a communications gentle men from Whitehorse in the 50s. Hes doesn't believe from his experience that a DC-4 would fly blind ,"such a flight diversion would have meant diverting off the airway, not talking to any of the Aeradio stations or towers along the way, etc."

Jason

Oh with the feathering problem theory, oil return lines and oil reservoir caps bust and pop off the tanks if too much pressure builds in the line..cold temps..vibration from turbulance..300 plus hours on the overhaul....etc

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 #18 
The Amber 2 airway pretty much followed the Alaska Highway from Snag on; so every 120 or so miles was a radio station and at most an emergency strip. These strips were put in place for the Lend Lease and were used in support of the Alcan road project. So they would have not been far off the airway if the weather was clear and since it was minus 25 I'm guessing it was pretty clear most of the way down. But yeah, my dad says the same thing about flying that 1500 or so miles from Snag counting on good weather. Crazy he called it. But until somebody pushes in with a bigger pile of evidence to support their theory then I have to like mine. I'm sticking with them electing to fly I Follow Roads and attempting to check in by transmitting in the blind. They didn't know for sure whether anyone was hearing them or not but they went through the motions. John Chalopka was flying back home; his father's funeral was being held up for his return. Plus Mrs Espe was having a troubled pregnancy. Setting down at an emergency strip or even a large city in Canada could have resulted in a considerable delay( a few days to a week?) so it is not unconceivable that the air crew decided to risk it. So they made it but turned too soon for Kalispell, the nearest US city with a military airfield. Suddenly unsure of where they were perhaps over the Kootenay they decided to try a quick radio call and switched on the electricals: the radioman trying a quick transmission while the pilot and copilot managed the windmilling engine. Before they could react the malfunctioning FMS catastrophically failed and started an engine fire. Still unsure of where they were and only able to really turn left they turned south and didn't clear the mountains.

I think that it is very likely that they made a compassion driven error in judgement and it cost all of them their lives. Pretty sad story if true. I'll know more when I get to see what the radios are tuned to.
AAIR

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 #19 

I see the shape you are referring to, but the problem I have with it is that it is the same colors as the rock around it. I think it is just a funky fracture or boulder from the rock face. That said, there is still a chance  (1 to 5% in my opinion) that it is an aircraft.


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JasonC

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 #20 
Interesting at this point anything is worth looking at. I have a few interesting objects that need a closer look too, sizes are right and so on. Have you done any measurements to get a rough idea the size. DC-4 is huge.

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 #21 
It would be pretty unlikely to shear off both wings flush with the fuselage and not break the fuselage itself. It would be even more unlikely that those wings would not be visible nearby considering the presence of a fairly intact fuselage.
Of course, as everyone here knows I'm convinced that AF 2469 is down in the Cranbrook Forest district so I can't be very objective.

As I mentioned to Jason last month's Air Classics magazine had an article on DC4/C54s and on page 27 was a photograph of AF 2469 flying over snowy mountains much like those along the Amber 2 airway. The caption incorrectly states that the plane was scrapped for parts at Biggs Field on 1/27/50, the day after it went missing. I am offering a case of your favorite beer to whomever first identifies for me the insignia on the nose of the plane in this picture. I am guessing that when lost AF 2469 was painted like the plane at the bottom of page 28 in that same issue, a simple version of the MATS scheme. And don't bother trying to contact the magazine's publishers as they are aviation playboys who are never in the office. Any takers?

Matt
msovinski

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 #22 
Hello!!  I have just started doing some research on the disappearance of this C-54D serial number 42-72469 for my Grandmother.  My Great Uncle was Co-Pilot First Lt. Mike Tisik.  There is still a large living family, that would like to know some more information.  It would give his living brother and sisters closure to a on going heartbreak for the last 60 years.  I have got some information off the Internet and would really love to know if there has been any searches for this aircraft in recent years.  Please, if any one has any information, I would love to hear from you.  My email address is msovinski@live.com
Thank you for taking the time to read this post!!
JasonC

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 #23 
Im still thinking about everything, and will be starting to continue the research. I looked a little bit into the "landing on a lake theory".  If the winter was as cold as stated the ice on the lakes would of been extremely thick and somewhat insulted.  I think its a 10" to 7 tons give or take. Also if there was a landing gear failure or not. Night landing....Moon light??? 50 knot wind. Possible ground blizzard.

I still think its in the snow line after the snag check point flight path high in the mountains.

I going to be focus on finding researchers  and bush pilot working in that area and Q and A then. So far I only have talked to one.

Jason

SAR

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 #24 
Good day gents, I have a picture dated back to 1946 (Douglas collection) of this Aircraft, it appears to be silver on the photograph.  I was wondering if anyone knew if they changed the paint scheme on it, or did it crash in this color?  I know some of them were re-painted with the fuselage white on top and silver at the bottom.

Any ideas?

Bruno

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 #25 
The crash report contains message traffic requests for a/c description that were answered 'red tail and wingtips'. the photo you probably have is one of several taken for the 54th TTS organization calendar(AprilMayJune) over Anchorage. the a/c was one year old at that time.

When lost the a/c was with the 2nd Strategic Support Squadron so it would have gotten a new squadron logo; possibly the red was added at that time. It may also have a green stripe above the window line as the 2nd SSS along with the 1st were referred to as the Green Hornet Line and transported nuke scientists during the war. Doubt that this a/c did much of that but it might have gotten the stripe anyway.
pinecastleaaf

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 #26 
Quote:
I still think its in the snow line after the snag check point flight path high in the mountains.



I thought I saw another thread about this updated a few days ago then it was gone?
JasonC

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 #27 
Hello
 
Ill explain my removel of a post as soon as I can.
 
Jason
pinecastleaaf

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 #28 
Hi Jason,
Anything going on with this?
Clint
catnarok

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 #29 
hello all
I live in the nwt but I go to the yukon/bc area every summer, and I'm really interested in looking for this aircraft. If anyone has any possible locations of this aircraft they'd like me to check out please let me know.  
Craig

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 #30 
My great uncle was the navigator on that flight. I never knew him but my great aunt Ruth Metzler went to her Lord never knowing what really happened to him or the other people on the plane. First Lt. Joe Metzler was his name. Our family has always wondered what really happened.
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