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DaveTrojan

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 #1 
Help is requested in the search for the crash site of C-141 that crashed in Bolivia.
Looking for Google Earth experts! They are also looking for anyone who wants wants to climb the mountain to the site. 

C-141 65-0274 crashed 18 August 1974 -assigned to 20th MAS and 437th MAW

A team wants to go down to La Paz & get some climbers to go to up the site to look for remains or aircraft parts. They are looking for the exact location of the crash site. 

They have a copy of the official accident report, but it does not give enough info about the exact location. 

Crash site is located at reported 18,700 foot level on west side of HUAYNA POTOSI, A HIGH NARROW PEAK IN LINE WITH HIS APPROACH TO EL ALTO BOLIVIA. 

Approximate coordinate:  16 15.5S  68 09W


More info here:
http://www.c141heaven.info/dotcom/65/pic_65_0274.php

accident narrative:
The airport at La Paz, the destination of the C-141, is located at an elevation of 13,325 feet (4077 m). Area weather at the time included extensive cloud cover from 700 agl to FL240. When the crew reported an estimated position of three minutes from the La Paz VOR, the controller cleared them a descent from FL240 to FL180. In fact, the aircraft was much further east of the VOR, than the crew believed. The crew started their descent until it impacted a 20,000 ft mountain at the 18,700 ft level (5700 m).


WaltW

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 #2 
The peak and surrounding areas above 18,000 ft are so covered in snow & ice that a GE search isn't going to see much more than white.
DaveTrojan

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 #3 
I see what you mean, what ever happened to global warming. 
Maybe the wreckage will slide downhill  
SamParker

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 #4 
I agree with Walt. Looking at Huayna Potosi on Google Earth doesn't show much but white. I think visiting the site is a noble gesture to help the families find closure however the GE image is not encouraging for reaching/finding the actual impact point. The west side of Huayna Potosi is a near vertical surface with huge slabs of ice clinging precariously on the side. You can see where these slabs of ice have broken off and fallen onto the glacier below.  Much of the remaining wreckage is probably buried under many feet of glacial ice. In any case climbing the west side looks to be extremely dangerous and not for anyone but true mountain climbing professionals.

Attached Images
Click image for larger version - Name: West side of Huayna Potosi .JPG, Views: 74, Size: 820.50 KB 

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AZTrailer47

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 #5 
A similar story is that of the BSAA  Avro Lancastrian,"Star Dust," that disappeared in the Andes of Argentina in 1947.

It was finally located by climbers in 1998 in/on a glacier on Mt Tupungato at 15,000 feet.    
WaltW

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 #6 
One of the news reports of the time says it hit and scattered onto a plateau but there isn't much "plateau" up there.  Given the altitude and terrain I doubt much if any was recovered.  There was an article I ran across detailing the recovery of more wrecks on that mountain as warming glaciers retreat.

Walt
DaveTrojan

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 #7 
Walt, can you post or send me a copy of the news report " news reports of the time says it hit and scattered onto a plateau"
DaveT 
WaltW

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 #8 
Here is the article.

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Click image for larger version - Name: C-141 report Long Beach Independent 20 Aug 74 pg2.jpg, Views: 42, Size: 108.77 KB 

DaveTrojan

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 #9 
Reply from those interested in visiting the C-141 crash site Bolivia.
"Wow!  Thank you so much.  You really put REALITY into any undertaking with that picture!(Google Earth photo Sam posted)  I'll forward it to Darrel so he can share it with his mountaineering contacts in La Paz.  As he once mentioned, we may go back just to get somewhat close & leave some sort of monument or something (probably below at the base).  I certainly will let you know if he comes up with anything else."

Thanks to all who contributed!
DaveT
WaltW

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 #10 
Sam's pic, not me.
DaveTrojan

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 #11 
corrected
AAIR

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 #12 
<<They have a copy of the official accident report, but it does not give enough info about the exact location.>>
Does the report have any aerial photos showing ridge lines or unique topography? If it does, between Walt, Sam, and myself, we might be able to narrow the location down for them.

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Craig AAIR, Aviation Archaeological Investigation and Research http://www.aviationarchaeology.com
DaveTrojan

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 #13 
I've asked for a copy of the accident report, but they have not sent it to me yet. I guy who has it is outta town. I'll follow up and let you know.

apthode1

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 #14 
Hello, my name is Ann Thode (Tant). My husband was the pilot of this plane. I have gone on to live a wonderful life with his two children and now grandchildren (7). I was 29 when this happened. My husband and I recently visited Peru, I could look across at the mountain. It reminded me of so much of what I/we had lost. Before I go (age 73) I would love to be able to see Jim and his 6 other mates, be buried. If not I saw that they are in an amazing place. Should anyone ever reach the site, I would love to hear from you.

Safe journeys
Ann

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ann thode
Fairlane66

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 #15 
If the mountain is truly as steep and snow-covered as Google Earth suggests, wouldn't it be logical to assume most of the wreckage has slid down the mountain to lower elevations over time and, therefore, a difficult (perhaps impossible) hike to the impact site might not be required?  I know that's the case with the C-124 that crashed into a mountain in Alaska, as well as the A-10 that flew into the side of Gold Dust Peak in Colorado years ago.  Nature pulled both sets of wreckage to lower elevations over time.  Surely the remains of an airplane the size of a C-141 wouldn't cling to the side of a sheer vertical cliff.  If someone is planning an expedition to determine what remains, it might be prudent to first start with the path of least resistance, i.e., scour the lower regions below the crash site first.  Just a thought.
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