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JackTheBestBoss

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 #1 
Hello,
I'm a young man who has been bite with the warbird bug, for years I have dreamed of finding a crashed ww2 aircraft and restore it to its former glory, a majestic, and capable, machine of war. Me, living in California, have scoured the internet for wrecks that are mostly intact, and have come up with a couple places to look, but still, I have very hard times finding stuff. I know quite a few TBF avengers and other navy planes crashed off San Diego, a couple avengers and f4u corsairs crashed off San Nicolas and San Clemente island, and at the top of my interests, the treasure trove of corsairs off Catalina island, with one, on the side of a cliff, with its main fuselage relatively intact, I found one photo off it in the late 70s, and I'd like to find that, as well as the other corsairs off Catalina. I know quite a few fighters, patrol planes, and 2 to 4 engine troop transport/bombers have crashed in the Mojave, Seirra Nevada, Mountains near Los Angeles, and northern California, the Pacific Northwest. Could you suggest and help me find some intact wrecks or at least have salvageable parts to use for other aircraft. Later in life, I’d like to join the warbird community make a name for myself, for right now I am limited because of my age. I do not seek to smelt parts for money, vandalize aircraft, or disrespect deceased servicemen who served our great nation. Maybe even restore it to flying condition, and teach generations to come the history and importance of the backbone of the USAF and the aircraft they flew. Coordinates, locations, pictures, and help would be much appreciated. Thanks for taking the time to read this.
 
 
 
Jack

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Jack Keating
DaveTrojan

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 #2 
Jack, Wake up you must be dreaming!
All the easy to recover warbirds are long gone. 

Any wrecks under the ocean are too corroded, and the Navy will never give you permission to recover one of their wrecks. 

If you are adventurist, You could join the team in Greenland recovering another P-38.

Or better yet, You could volunteer at an Aviation Museum to help maintain the planes that have already been recovered and help teach people about their importance.  
djordan

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 #3 
Well said Dave!
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Don Jordan
JackTheBestBoss

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 #4 
It all depends, ill never give up. They are still out there. The islands in the pacific ocean(japanese occupied islands during ww2 are filled with them) yes, getting permits from the navy is a pain in the ass, but it is not impossible. 
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Jack Keating
Dennis

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 #5 
Jack, Here's a more mild sense of what the others have said.  Years ago (like 20-40) there were some "salvagable" wrecks.  Some.  The military was pretty determined to save what they could, salvage what could not be saved, and destroy what could be reached, but neither salvaged or saved.  Cases in point: constructing a runway through a wooded tract to "fly off" a damaged B-17 that had been force landed and repaired.  Bulldozed trails into swamps to recover - or bury wreckage of planes that weren't so accessible.  Ran cable into a swamp to drag out wreckage.  Trekked into a swamp and dynamited (more than one) aircraft after salvage tactics didn't pan out (almost lost a tracked recovery vehicle).  For example: at Avon Park Bombing Range (well over 30 mishaps), salvage / recycle included everything EXCEPT coffee grounds and egg shells.  EVERYTHING else was salvaged (this did decrease some later during the war).  These are known situations I have dealt with.
After WWII, many "salvors" went in and scrounged anything of value from many sites that were known and accessible.  Some sites survived.  
In the 70s (from my experience and learning), there was a renewed interest in warbirds from the movie "Tora, Tora, Tora" and a few others.  Warbirds that had sported custom paint and racing modifications, began to trend towards restoration to military configuration and colors.  During this time, renewed efforts on recovery of remaining wrecks picked up (availability of helicopter lift).  During this time, aircraft also started being recovered from fresh water lakes.  The other extreme during the 70s saw the price of scrap aluminum rise and many sites were processed for scrap.  There are some here who have been to sites where portable smelters were set up - in remote locations, and all that remains are unwanted steel parts.  From time to time, I am contacted by people who have been offered big money (like 100K) for even the location of recoverable warbirds.  Haven't heard of many worthwhile recoveries in a LONG time.
Yes, there may be a few - VERY FEW, remaining wrecks.  Getting to them and recovering them would be a daunting and expensive task.  RESTORING one to flying state, would take MILLIONS.  That's the reality.  As Dave said, the remaining BIG adventure / recovery
would be the Greenland operations, and their time window is limited by the movement of the ice field.  There are restoration opportunities for those who have time to donate with The Commemorative Air Force, operations at Chino Ca, and many other museums.   That's where it stands.  Dennis
canyonair

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 #6 
Alaska might be your best bet for locating a salvageable WW2 wreck with minimal corrosion due to the dry cold temperatures, but if someone knows the location and is smart, the chances of anyone giving out the coordinates is just about nil.
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Research of historical civil and commercial aviation accidents and sites (1920s-1990s). http://www.lostflights.com
Dennis

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 #7 
Last I heard, EVERYTHING in Alaska is protected.  Dennis
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