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Kiefer

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 #1 
My brother found this in the woods.
381855_10150395753366025_1904551626_n.jpg 

Kiefer

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 #2 
Here's another with engine laying in front of aircraft.
379527_10150395754761025_878843108_n.jpg 

DaveTrojan

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 #3 
COOL! 
looks like you found the Predator's father. 
was it on base?

Kiefer

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 #4 
Hi Dave,
Yes, it's on base. My brother is a game warden on base and said it's way, way back in the woods. His comment, when I asked about getting it?. It'll take 5 people to take it out of the woods and it wouldn't fit in the bed of a pickup. It's alot bigger than it looks in the picture.[smile]. I was hoping someone might be interested and restore it for display.
Dennis

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 #5 
One from Avon Park was found in a swamp and fully restored.  It is on display over there now.  I would hope someone would recognize the rarity of these and recover and restore it.  I'd love to see a better picture of the engine.  It doesn't look like the normal McCullough drone engines I have seen.  Dennis
ChrisBaird

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 #6 
What a beauty!
Is it a QQ-19?

--> Chris B.

05QQ19TargetDrone
DaveTrojan

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 #7 
Sure looks like a QQ-19 drone.  Thanks Chris. 

Anybody have history about how they were used and what for?

I guess recovery/restoration depends on 2 things.

1. Can the wing be removed to be able to transport it through the forest?

2. What is the condition of the engine? Can it be restored? What remains of it? 

DaveT
Dennis

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 #8 
And on a second look, I believe that is a McCullough 4318 engine.  It is sideways as seen in the picture and to the right is the magneto end (firewall end).  I think the round black thing next to it is the distributor cap.  Those engines came in 2, 4 (this one) and 6 cylinder models.  All used the same pistons and cylinders.  This engine is most likely junk other than as a static piece.  Dennis
Kiefer

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 #9 
Just called my brother. He said there are about 15 of these target drones that he has come across. Told me where they use to launch them in a circler take off ramp. Planning a trip to go check them out. With the U.S. Army hope. I can get one. Anybody know he proticale or paper to go through.
DaveTrojan

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 #10 
Since the wrecks are located on base, then you need to contact the base Public Affairs Office and or base Historian if they have one. Also ask for the base cultural resource manager/environmental department. They need to know what is on their base property. If you are lucky they may have a museum or heritage room or display area. Ask permission to restore one for them in return they give you one. Or ask permission by stating you are helping clean up the environment. You will need paperwork from them granting custody / permission to recover artifact. On the other hand, they may not be interested. 

But before you go and inquire at the base, do your homework.
What are they? 
What were they used for?
How many used?
When were they used, how old are they?
Any hazards? (fuel, oil, ordnance)  

Try and present a case for why you want to recover one.
Also What are you going to do with it once recovered (Have a plan). recover for static display? not reuse. 

Make it a win win situation. You win by checking out/recovering a piece of history
The base wins by cleaning up the environment and eliminating hazards.

It would make a good story for the PAO Public Affairs Office too.

If you need more help, contact me. I have done this kind of thing before.

I think they are cool and I would want one too.  
DaveT
ChrisBaird

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 #11 
Sorry. Make that OQ-19...
DaveTrojan

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 #12 
Radioplane OQ-19-D target drone.jpg 

Northrop (Radioplane) OQ-19/KD2R/MQM-33
The MQM-33 is a simple propeller-driven full-scale aerial target. In production in various versions for over 40 years, the MQM-33 family is one of the most successful targets ever built.

In 1945, Radioplane created the Model RP-19 by replacing the O-45 engine in the OQ-17 target with a higher-rated O-90 engine. The RP-19 was tested by the USAAF as the YOQ-19 in July 1945, and ordered into production in 1946 as the OQ-19A. The OQ-19A had a metal fuselage and wooden wings (later OQ-19As would use metal wings). Like all following members of the family, it could be launched from a catapult launcher, a rotary launcher, or from a zero-length launcher with the aid of a 9.6 kN (2160 lb) thrust solid-fueled booster rocket. The Air Force drones could also be air-launched, usually from DB-26C aircraft. The OQ-19s were controlled from the ground by a radio command link, which used an AN/URW-3 transmitter and an AN/ARW-26AY receiver. Recovery was by parachute, which was deployed by radio command or automatically after loss of vital systems. The OQ-19C was a derivative of the OQ-19A, which had metal wings from the beginning and a significantly modified vertical tail without a rudder. The OQ-19C used the same O-90 engine as the OQ-19A.

In 1950, the XOQ-19B was tested with metal wings, a more powerful O-100 engine, and a vertical gyro for out-of-sight operation. This model was produced as the OQ-19B and could be tracked by the out-of-sight operator using an X-band radar tracking system. The OQ-19D, first flown in April 1950, was similar to the OQ-19B, but lacked the out-of-sight operation capability, and was optically tracked using drone-mounted smoke flares or lights. The OQ-19B/D used the same rudder-less vertical tail as the OQ-19C. The OQ-19B/D was also used by the U.S. Army, and it is possible that one of these versions was designated XM23E1 by the Army.

Beginning in 1960, the U.S. Army flight-tested the OQ-19E (Radioplane Model RP-92), which was essentially a new aircraft with a new circular-section fuselage, reinforced wings and a McCulloch O-150-4 turbocharged engine. Although the OQ-19E showed good performance, no production order followed, and the program was terminated in 1961.

The U.S. Navy also used the OQ-19 family of drones, designating them in the KD2R Quail series. The initial Navy production version was the KD2R-1, identical to the OQ-19A. The KD2R-2 was similar to the -1, except for a 28V radio and a stabilization system. The NAMTC (Naval Air Missile Test Center) tested modified stabilization systems in the KD2R-2E. The KD2R-3 was identical to the OQ-19D, and the XKD2R-4 was a development of the -3 except for engine and stabilization system. It is possible that the XKD2R-4 was similar to the OQ-19E.


The KD2R-5 Shelduck was an improved model, which was later redesignated as MQM-36A.

Between 1950 and 1960, the OQ-19/KD2R was built in very large numbers, including almost 20000 OQ-19s of all versions for the USAF and the Army. The target was used for anti-aircraft gunnery and surface-to-air missile training. By 1963, only the OQ-19B/D versions were still in use by the Army, and the Navy had discarded all models except for the KD2R-5. In June that year, the variants still in service were redesignated as follows:

Old Designation New Designation
OQ-19B MQM-33A
OQ-19D MQM-33B
KD2R-5 MQM-36A

In 1973, Northrop introduced a new G-band command and control system for the MQM-33 targets. When equipped with this system, the MQM-33A and MQM-33B became the MQM-33C and MQM-33D, respectively. Production of the MQM-33C for the U.S. Army National Guard continued until the late 1980s, but it's no longer in service with the Army.

In the 1980s, the OQ-19 drone family was generally referred to as BTT (Basic Training Target), and more than 73000 drones of all BTT versions (OQ-19, KD2R, MQM-33, MQM-36) were built. Another derivative of the MQM-33 was the MQM-57 Falconer surveillance drone.

Specifications
Note: Data given by several sources show slight variations. Figures given below may therefore be inaccurate!

Data for OQ-19D (MQM-33B):

Length 3.73 m (12 ft 3 in)
Wingspan 3.48 m (11 ft 5 in)
Height 0.79 m (2 ft 7 in)
Weight 145 kg (320 lb)
Speed 370 km/h (230 mph)
Ceiling 7620 m (25000 ft)
Endurance 60 min.
Range 320 km (200 miles)
Propulsion McCulloch O-100-1 piston engine; 54 kW (72 hp)

Main Sources
[1] Richard A. Botzum: "50 Years of Target Drone Aircraft", Northrop, 1985
[2] Kenneth Munson: "World Unmanned Aircraft", Jane's, 1988
[3] Kenneth Munson (ed.): "Jane's Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Targets, Issue 15", Jane's, 2000
[4] R.T. Pretty, D.H.R. Archer (eds.): "Jane's Weapon Systems 1972-73", Jane's, 1973
[5] Norman J. Bowman: "The Handbook of Rockets and Guided Missiles", Perastadion Press, 1963
[6] "Characteristics Summary OQ-19D", U.S. Air Force, 1954 & 1960


Dennis

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 #13 
A hunting site on the web had a guy who found 3 of them within a mile near Ft Stewart while hog hunting.  None were in as good a shape as this one.  Dennis
Getting clearance from the military - one thing
Getting clearance from the wife...
Kiefer

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Posts: 84
 #14 
Thanks to Dave and Dennis. For the info. I'll see what I can do. I'll keep you you'all updated.
Kiefer

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 #15 
Dennis, I don't have to worry of the wife thing. I was trying to figure how to get this thing out. You know how brothers are?. Come get it. It's already lost. They forgot it year's ago. But we want to do the right thing as far as propper removel and ownership and were it's gonna go.
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