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ThunderPigC130

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 #1 
Hello

  Found this at an F15A crash site yesterday.  Looks to be a small rocket motor.  I believe it to be part of the ejection seat, which for this aircraft should have been an ESCAPAC.  The problem is i have found an intact ESCAPAC before and the rocket motor that launches the seat was much larger.  I dont think this rocket could have launched a seat.

  Photo 1 :  The object in question is the horizontal cylinder in about the middle of the picture.  Nozzle pointed down.

  Photo 2 :  Same item but this time a head on shot of the nozzle, which appears to have been fired.

  Photo 3 :  Overall shot of what the cylinder is mounted to.  Note parachute straps in the upper left.

  Photo 4 :  This braided hose was attached to the device.

  Anybody know what this is?

Thanks

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ffuries

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 #2 
It's part of an ACES II Ejection Seat, and the part you are looking at is the Pitch Stabilization Control Assembly. Let me see if I can find a picture of the setup.

ETA: Here's a link to an explanation of the assembly and a diagram showing the parts.



http://www.ejectionsite.com/a10aces.htm



http://www.ejectionsite.com/acesiitech.htm

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Mike
TSgt USAF Retired
Jan 86 - Sept 08
Aircrew Life Support
"Your Life Is Our Business"
(122X0, 1T1X1, 1P0X1)
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ThunderPigC130

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 #3 
Hello Mike and thanks for replying. 

  After posting i looked at some more pictures of ejection seats and figured out on my own it was an ACES 2, not an ESCAPAC by one of the handles i found ( Picture attached ).

  In the attached picture i have two pull handles.  The one with the two square openings sits back and on the right side of the seat.  It does not initiate the ejection.  Do you know what it does?  My guess is that it is what they used to call the "Guillotine" on the old martin baker seats and us used to manually separate the pilot from the seat in the event of a ground emergency or if the seat fails to separate on its own.

  Any idea what the small triangular handle is for?  I am guessing it is to release the seat kit, but thats just a guess.

  Thanks for your help -

  PS - Found the survival radio from the seat kit.  What a find !!

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ffuries

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 #4 
The square one is the Emergency Manual Chute Handle, it is located on the right side on the seat pan about center. If I'm recalling correctly from memory, been 22 years since working on an ACES II seat. It is an emergency/backup system in the event of man seat seperation failure.

The triangular one is for the kit. It's located on the kit itself and is the manual activation handle and lanyard, it's located on the front right edge of the survival kit if I recall correctly. This was pulled in the event of automatic opening of the survival kit failed, thus allowing the aircrew to manually deploy the kit prior to landing or conducting their PLF.

The survival radio most likely is a PRC-90, but depending on when the incident was it could be an URC-64 radio. Don't know how much of the radio's label survived intact.

Was this aircraft still manned when it went in? As you stated it was an A model thus a single seat version. It's weird as to how much survival equipment parts are still around. I know in the 3 aircraft losses in units I was in (2 OV-10s and 1 F-15), all the survival equipment that was recoverable was recovered for evaluation, inspection, to see if it worked correctly,survived the ejection intact, and to see if we did everything right in our inspections and maintaining of the equipment.

Seen a few careers destroyed because of improperly maintained Life Support equipment found during crash investigations.

Had to edit my answer as I managed to get the information of the Rockwell International Seat (OV-10) and ACES II Seat (F-15 in this case) confused and intermingled in my brain, thus also in my answer.

Isn't aging fun.......

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Mike
TSgt USAF Retired
Jan 86 - Sept 08
Aircrew Life Support
"Your Life Is Our Business"
(122X0, 1T1X1, 1P0X1)
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ThunderPigC130

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 #5 
Hello Mike
  The square one is the Emergency Manual Chute Handle ... It is an emergency/backup system in the event of man seat seperation failure. 

  Ah so i got that one right.  It is equivalent to the guillotine on the old martin baker seats - A manual backup to separate the man from the seat in the event of a ground emergency or if man / seat separation fails to occur on its own after ejection.

The triangular one is for the kit.

  All right i am two for two !

The survival radio most likely is a PRC-90.  Don't know how much of the radio's label survived intact. 

  Not much.  It got roasted in the post crash fire.  All the rubber is gone.  From looking at pics online its one of the PRC family.  There were a few variants.  In its current condition hard to nail down exactly which one.

Seen a few careers destroyed because of improperly maintained Life Support equipment found during crash investigations.

  Well as they say, "The rule book is written in blood".  I can only think of one incident in which an improperly rigged seat failed to fire and led to a fatility - The marine F4J down on the goldwater range.  Sad all the way around - For the family of the deceased and the the guy who has to live with the knowledge that his actions led to the death of one of his aircrews.

  Thanks for your assist mike, much appreciated.
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