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DaveTrojan

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 #1 

Sometimes Aviation Archaeology is not always about finding a crash site. It can be about exploring abandoned airfields, discovering the histories of the aircraft that were based there, finding the place where the planes were once located and trying to protect the site. I was asked to research aircraft revetments at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Ewa Hawaii in an effort to determine their significance. Using clues from photographs, I was able to trace the history of one of the aircraft that used the revetments. I discovered the aircraft history was very interesting, historic and significant.  The site of the revetments is under threat of development. Hopefully this information will help protect the site.

See attached story about 
Brewster Buffalo F2A-3 BuNo 01562 MF-13

MCAS Ewa revetment site pictures attached below. Fragments of concrete stucco found. Further exploration may reveal some  Brewster Buffalo parts! 

Brewster_F2A-3_Buffalo_fighter.jpg 


concrete stucco from revetment.JPG 
stucco pieces.JPG 

 ALOHA!
 

 
Attached Files
pdf F2A-3_01562.pdf (590.68 KB, 33 views)

Dennis

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 #2 
Dave, Thanks for another interesting report.  I can add a small bit of information.  Many years ago, I read a story of what was probably one of the last Buffalo flights.  It was written by a Navy pilot who was in Florida. He wanted to have as many different aircraft entries in his log as possible, and he was at a field and noticed a beat up Buffalo parked in the back of the base.  He asked if it was airworthy, and the reply was that it was, but nobody wanted to fly it.  He had it prepped and made ready for flight.  On checking out he was told "do not close the canopy.  They are known for sticking, and you don't want to be trapped in the plane".  Apparently, the S.O.P. for flying a Buffalo in Florida was open canopy.  He mentioned that the flight was uneventful.  Dennis
Don't recall the name of the book, but it was about carrier planes, and also featured several crash pictures of Wildcat variants at Sanford N.A.S., where they averaged one FATAL crash per week.  Dennis 
DaveTrojan

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Any Buffalo crash sites in Florida? It would be historic to find any remains of one. 
Like one that crashed in a swamp or did they all disappear in the Bermuda Triangle? 
Moxie1

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 #4 
Hi Dave, Yes I know a few different crash site around NAS MIAMI I have been to a couple with the late Harry Doans he had a mape with all the location's of Florida crash sites the last I heard was the family had all of his record books since I only knew Harry I never asked the family.
Dennis

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 #5 
Hey Dave, contact me when you get a chance.  Dennis
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