Wreckchasing Message Board
Register  |   |   |  Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
WaltW

Registered:
Posts: 382
 #1 
   Just a reminder since some of us pursue our interests onto or near old inactive public accessible military ranges.  Be careful.  I've been working with GE over an active range that reports indicate is so dangerous it will take 5 to 10 years to clean up if they ever get the money to do it.  So far I've found 2 crash sites there just as an exercise but know I'll never visit them.  The organization that oversees the area report random detonations triggered by rapidly changing temperature alone.  The area is a moonscape of craters, ordinance lying in situ, and unknown fragments many dating from WWII.

We don't go to places like that but in poking around we do see stuff.  Be careful.  I remember going out on a trip in '98 with several chasers to hunt a P-38 midair near Three Sisters north of Barstow on what is now the Superior Lake Gunnery Range.  This was before the DOD bought all the land around Three Sisters and closed it.  We were walking in an old artillery range.  No craters from live ordinance but ordinance everywhere.  Is that a coffee can in the sand?  No, that's the ass end of a 155 shell...  Uh, me thinks the public shouldn't be here...  They wised up and closed it.

Some info:  http://www.denix.osd.mil/uxo/Links.cfm

The little surprise under a bush in the photo was just inside the Edwards AFB boundary back in 1998.  The pic was taken with full telephoto zoom from off base and I got the hell out of there.  It's projected GPS coords from where I took the shot were reported to Edwards EOD the same day.  EOD guessed it was a WWII era concrete filled 1000 pounder and they'd take care of it.  Don't want to see one of those again.  This was in an area where an old early WWII bombing target is bisected by the modern base boundary.

MVC-011S.JPG 

Walt

djordan

Registered:
Posts: 453
 #2 
Very good post Walt.  I am out on the Mojave range a lot.  So far I have found, by accident, three unexploded bombs.  The first one caught me by surprise, but I was cautious enough to not dig it up and to leave the area.  That was 10 years ago.  I reported it to the Police Department, and they in turn called Edwards EOD.  We were able to watch from 1/2 mile away as they detonated it.  That really gets your attention.

Then just three months ago, I discovered two more live bombs just 1/2 mile from a residential area. I once again called PD, and once again EOD came out and blew them both up.  I have since made arrangements with PD to locate and mark all ordnance that I find out there.  Below are two  photos of the results of the last  one I found.  I'm glad I was a half mile away when it went off.  The first photo show the bomb as discovered.11080300_375740659277979_8681273014942337792_o.jpg 

11095592_375740835944628_8859840892121238702_o.jpg


__________________
Don Jordan
DaveTrojan

Avatar / Picture

Moderators
Registered:
Posts: 2,334
 #3 
And if you don't know what it is, leave it alone...
AND NEVER, EVER PICK IT UP!!! as I slowly backed away... 
Is it live or what??? 

DSCN6453.JPG 
DSCN6452.JPG 

DaveTrojan

Avatar / Picture

Moderators
Registered:
Posts: 2,334
 #4 
I found these at old Wheeler Field on Oahu Hawaii and they caused quite a stir... EOD was contacted.  I believe They were 14" artillery rounds just abandoned. You just never know...
14 inch shells Waieli Gulch Field edit.jpg 
  


DaveTrojan

Avatar / Picture

Moderators
Registered:
Posts: 2,334
 #5 
Found on the Barry Goldwater Range Arizona. Buried missile. Is it live???I did not dig it up to discover more...Anybody know what it is?

PICT0037 edit.jpg

SixbyFire

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 406
 #6 
I can't find an exacting match with the way the fins attach, but that buried missile sure looks like a Sidewinder air to air missile to me.

Edit: Maybe not. Can't find one just like it, all the ones I found had the fins set more forward or had a different way to attach the fins.

Jeff
DaveTrojan

Avatar / Picture

Moderators
Registered:
Posts: 2,334
 #7 
I think it is a Sidewinder. 
DaveT
SixbyFire

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 406
 #8 
Found an older model Sidewinder after a lengthy Flickr search: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sarge_schultz/9226585328/

It has the same fin arrangement and attachments, and even the one screw/attachment point between the fins visible on the desert one. The Sidewinder missile in the Flickr photo is in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C., so I'm guessing its an older one buried out there in the desert...

Jeff
Angusnofangus

Registered:
Posts: 18
 #9 
It is indeed a Sidewinder. The hinged sections with rollers on the corner of the fins are a dead give-away. I was an Ordnanceman in US Navy, Viet Nam era, and loaded lots of them.
SixbyFire

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 406
 #10 

So with positive ID now, I wonder if its just the back fin, or did it go nose in and buried itself? Or is that even possible to go nose in all the way like that? I wonder if it would shatter/break up instead of burying itself?

Jeff

DaveTrojan

Avatar / Picture

Moderators
Registered:
Posts: 2,334
 #11 
The ground in the area is just soft sand and if it was wet at the time the missile could have easily buried itself entirely. But, I'm not going to dig it up to find out. 
XHunter

Avatar / Picture

Moderator
Registered:
Posts: 840
 #12 
It almost looks like a practice round or a boilerplate mock-up. The motor exhaust tube looks to be made of steel. In the photo below, albeit from a newer missile, it seems to be aluminum. Also, since the rollerons are still so close by, it might have been completely buried with them and then slowly uncovered by wind and rain. Still wouldn't screw with it...

sidewinder tail section.jpg 


__________________
http://www.thexhunters.com - Searching for the lost aircraft of Edwards AFB
petef86a

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 128
 #13 
Even off ranges we often find .50 cal. and 20mm rounds, seat actuators and IFF destructors. Somewhere out there in the Maine woods are 24 FFARs that may or may not have detonated on impact.

It pays to be very observant and careful.

One of my safety briefing points is that if you find a large ball bearing, but it is as heavy as lead when you pick it up, and warm to the touch, put it down and just walk away! (Maine humor)
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.